News

Mean temperature and precipitation maps for Alaska

A new web-based tool will allow communities in Alaska and western Canada to see how global climate change could affect their regions.

A team in the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks created the tool, which transforms predictions from global climate models into more detailed information about local conditions.

The FIRST Network is accepting applications for an upcoming workshop, Mentoring Our Own Native Scientists (MOONS) on Sept 19-21, 2018 in Lawrence, Kansas.

We have a new budget and a new name — we are now the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center.

“I sat through talk after talk thinking I just want someone to tell me a story. That’s when I started looking into StoryCorps.”

The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals is excited to be collaborating with Copper River Native Association on an Introduction to Climate Change Adaptation Planning course. This course provides an overview to planning for climate change impacts, highlighting the work of several tribes. The course is intended for tribal environmental and natural resource professionals who expect to be involved in climate change adaptation planning.

 2018 CLIMATE CHANGE AND MY COMMUNITY

Course Date: June 18-22, 2018

Location: University of Alaska Fairbanks Campus and nearby field sites

AK CASC program coordinator Jane Wolken was accepted into the inaugural American Geophysical Union (AGU) Voices for Science Program in the Media/Public Communications Track. This program provides participants with access to science communication and outreach training as well as the support needed for outreach activities in their local community. 

Mendenhall glacier sits roughly 12 miles north of Juneau, Alaska. It’s the only barrier between the Suicide Basin sub-glacial lake and hundreds of residents as well as the critical infrastructure that serves over 32,000 people. In 2011 and 2014, Suicide Basin broke its ice barrier and an outburst flood destroyed nearby trails and property. Since then, these events have been increasing, which causes a significant threat to downstream infrastructure and public safety.

The newly published paper, Hydrologic Regime Changes in a High-Latitude Glacierized Watershed under Future Climate Conditions, highlights the projected increase of Copper River discharge due to an increase in precipitation and glacial melt water

This 13-minute video, featuring IARC Research Associate Katie Spellman and SNAP's Nancy Fresco, explains the importance and relevance of computer modeling in making sense of climate change.

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