Understanding the response of Alaska's ecosystems to a changing climate to support resource managers and sustainable communities

 

Melting glaciers are not just impacting sea level, they are also affecting the flow of organic carbon to the world’s oceans, according to new research that provides the first ever global-scale estimates for the storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers.

The research, published in the Jan. 19 issue of Nature Geoscience, is crucial to better understand the role glaciers play in the global carbon cycle, especially as climate warming continues to reduce glacier ice stores and release ice-locked organic carbon into downstream freshwater and marine ecosystems.

Research Will Provide Land and Wildlife Managers with Tools to Adapt to Climate Change

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center is awarding more than $500,000 to universities and other partners for research to guide managers of parks, refuges and other cultural and natural resources in planning how to help species and ecosystems adapt to climate change.

Melting glaciers, shifting wildlife populations and warming stream temperatures are just a few of the critical natural resources that will be discussed at the Climate, Conservation, and Community in Alaska and Northwest Canada conference being held Nov. 4-5 at the Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage, Alaska.

In partnership with the Aleutian and Bearing Sea Islands LCC and the Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS), the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center will sponsor a community conversation on climate change in Unalaska, Alaska. This session is being hosted by the Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska and will take place on September 18 from 7:00-9:00 PM at the Museum of the Aleutians.

Along with USGS colleagues Ed Neal and Gary Solin, AK CASC and Alaska Science Center hydrologist Ryan Toohey has published a new USGS open file report, Guidelines for the Collection of Continuous Stream Water-Temperature Data in Alaska.

Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center and USGS Alaska Science Center hydrologist Ryan Toohey has joined fellow USGS researchers Paul Schuster and Nicole Herman-Mercer in conducting an innovative project known as “Strategic Needs of Water on the Yukon” or SNOWY.

The USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) and seven of the eight (Alaska, North Central, Northeast, Pacific Islands, South Central, Southeast and Southwest) Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers (CASCs) are seeking Statements of Interest (SOIs) and proposals for funding in Fiscal Year (FY) 2015.

The Third National Climate Assessment (NCA) provides a comprehensive summary of climate change impacts on the U.S., now and in the future. The report includes observed trends and projected future conditions of climate change in the United States, as well as information on climate change mitigation and adaptation.  

Jeremy Littell, Alaska CASC Lead Scientist, will present two talks for the Alaska Fire Science Consortium at the Spring Alaska Fire Science Workshop in Fairbanks, AK, April 2, 2014.

Each year a massive amount of freshwater—equal to nearly twice the annual discharge of the Mississippi River—enters the Gulf of Alaska. This freshwater runoff is economically and ecologically important, but a new study supported by the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center shows that as glaciers change, future runoff patterns from may have important regional differences.

Pages

Libby Roderick stands at the front of a room, speaking.

The AK CASC brought together a community of academics and researchers to address the challenge of difficult dialogues on our campus.

AK CASC on Twitter

Research Highlight

Learn more about Amy Breen's current work and future plans. Amy is a Research Assistant Professor with the Scenarios Network for Alaska & Arctic Planning at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Subscribe to Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center RSS