Understanding the response of Alaska's Ecosystems to a changing climate to support resource managers and sustainable communities

 

John Walsh, an AK CASC scientist and chief scientist at the International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, received the 2016 International Arctic Science Committee Medal.

Government officials, diplomats from around the world, and the President of the United States visited Alaska in late August and early September to discuss climate change in Alaska and the Arctic. The Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center administrators, scientists, fellows, and research projects were prominent throughout the special activities and events held around the state.

The Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center, along with NOAA, NASA, OSTP, and other agencies, provided scientific expertise for the newly released Arctic Theme in the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit. The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is comprised of datasets and resources designed to facilitate resilience to climate impacts, and is part of the Obama Administration’s Climate Data Initiative (CDI).

“It’s going to be a bad fire day,” said Dr. Scott Rupp, university director of the Interior Department’s Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center and a fire ecologist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, as he looked out the window at the thick layer of smoke blanketing the city of Fairbanks.

A new scientific synthesis suggests a gradual, prolonged release of greenhouse gases from permafrost soils in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions, which may afford society more time to adapt to environmental changes, say scientists in a paper published in Nature today.

A new report produced by members of the Integrated Ecosystem Model research team describes the progress of the IEM project between January 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014.

Videos of presentations from the Climate, Conservation, and Community in Alaska and Northwest Canada Conference are now available

Is it going to be a busy fire season, or will it be wet in Alaska this summer? New geographic climate divisions for Alaska can help answer these questions.

Frozen bodies of ice cover nearly 10 percent of the state of Alaska, but the influence of glaciers on the environment, tourism, fisheries, hydropower, and other important Alaska resources is rarely discussed.

But a new article published this week in the journal BioScience has started the conversation.

During 2015, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center researchers across several disciplines have produced many new publications:

Hood, E, Battin, TJ, Fellman, J, O’Neel, S, and Spencer, RGM. 2015. Storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers and ice sheets. Nature Geoscience. 8: 91–96. doi:10.1038/ngeo2331

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Our name has changed but our mission is the same

We have a new budget and a new name — we are now the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center.

Upcoming Events

Location: 
Fairbanks, AK
Date: 
Thursday, June 14, 2018 (All day) to Friday, June 15, 2018 (All day)

Are you new to formal leadership training, or looking to improve your leadership skills? Do you want to know what it means to be a mindful leader? Are you interested in enhancing diversity and inclusivity within your workplace? Are you part of the University of Alaska? If so, join others at UAF on June 14-15, 2018 for a highly interactive, retreat-style workshop on ‘Mindful Leadership: Creating a Diverse and Inclusive UA’ organized by UAF researchers Joanna Young, Jane Wolken and Jessie Young-Robertson, and sponsored by Alaska NSF EPSCoR.

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