Understanding the response of Alaska's ecosystems to a changing climate to support resource managers and sustainable communities

 

A new report produced by members of the Integrated Ecosystem Model research team describes the progress of the IEM project between January 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014.

Videos of presentations from the Climate, Conservation, and Community in Alaska and Northwest Canada Conference are now available

Is it going to be a busy fire season, or will it be wet in Alaska this summer? New geographic climate divisions for Alaska can help answer these questions.

Frozen bodies of ice cover nearly 10 percent of the state of Alaska, but the influence of glaciers on the environment, tourism, fisheries, hydropower, and other important Alaska resources is rarely discussed.

But a new article published this week in the journal BioScience has started the conversation.

During 2015, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center researchers across several disciplines have produced many new publications:

Hood, E, Battin, TJ, Fellman, J, O’Neel, S, and Spencer, RGM. 2015. Storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers and ice sheets. Nature Geoscience. 8: 91–96. doi:10.1038/ngeo2331

During 2014, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center researchers across several disciplines have produced many new publications:

Bennett, KE and Walsh, JE. 2014. Spatial and temporal changes in indices of extreme precipitation and temperature for Alaska. International Journal of Climatology. doi: 10.1002/joc.4067   

Kristin Timm, a designer with the Interior Department's Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center and the University of Alaska Fairbanks Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, is among 10 designers who were recently recognized internationally for excellence in science communication.

Cosponsored by Popular Science magazine and the National Science Foundation, the Visualization Challenge competition — the Vizzies — recognizes some of the best scientific photos, videos, posters and illustrations produced each year.

Melting glaciers are not just impacting sea level, they are also affecting the flow of organic carbon to the world’s oceans, according to new research that provides the first ever global-scale estimates for the storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers.

The research, published in the Jan. 19 issue of Nature Geoscience, is crucial to better understand the role glaciers play in the global carbon cycle, especially as climate warming continues to reduce glacier ice stores and release ice-locked organic carbon into downstream freshwater and marine ecosystems.

Research Will Provide Land and Wildlife Managers with Tools to Adapt to Climate Change

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center is awarding more than $500,000 to universities and other partners for research to guide managers of parks, refuges and other cultural and natural resources in planning how to help species and ecosystems adapt to climate change.

Melting glaciers, shifting wildlife populations and warming stream temperatures are just a few of the critical natural resources that will be discussed at the Climate, Conservation, and Community in Alaska and Northwest Canada conference being held Nov. 4-5 at the Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage, Alaska.

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U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) leadership, including the newly appointed USGS director and former astronaut Dr. James Reilly, visited Fairbanks in late August to discuss AK CASC work across Alaska and the Arctic.

Research Highlight

Come late May in southeast Alaska, AK CASC scientists Eran Hood and Gabriel Wolken have something unexpected on their minds: snow.

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