Understanding the response of Alaska's ecosystems to a changing climate to support resource managers and sustainable communities

 

Frozen bodies of ice cover nearly 10 percent of the state of Alaska, but the influence of glaciers on the environment, tourism, fisheries, hydropower, and other important Alaska resources is rarely discussed.

But a new article published this week in the journal BioScience has started the conversation.

During 2015, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center researchers across several disciplines have produced many new publications:

Hood, E, Battin, TJ, Fellman, J, O’Neel, S, and Spencer, RGM. 2015. Storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers and ice sheets. Nature Geoscience. 8: 91–96. doi:10.1038/ngeo2331

During 2014, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center researchers across several disciplines have produced many new publications:

Bennett, KE and Walsh, JE. 2014. Spatial and temporal changes in indices of extreme precipitation and temperature for Alaska. International Journal of Climatology. doi: 10.1002/joc.4067   

Kristin Timm, a designer with the Interior Department's Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center and the University of Alaska Fairbanks Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, is among 10 designers who were recently recognized internationally for excellence in science communication.

Cosponsored by Popular Science magazine and the National Science Foundation, the Visualization Challenge competition — the Vizzies — recognizes some of the best scientific photos, videos, posters and illustrations produced each year.

Melting glaciers are not just impacting sea level, they are also affecting the flow of organic carbon to the world’s oceans, according to new research that provides the first ever global-scale estimates for the storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers.

The research, published in the Jan. 19 issue of Nature Geoscience, is crucial to better understand the role glaciers play in the global carbon cycle, especially as climate warming continues to reduce glacier ice stores and release ice-locked organic carbon into downstream freshwater and marine ecosystems.

Research Will Provide Land and Wildlife Managers with Tools to Adapt to Climate Change

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center is awarding more than $500,000 to universities and other partners for research to guide managers of parks, refuges and other cultural and natural resources in planning how to help species and ecosystems adapt to climate change.

Melting glaciers, shifting wildlife populations and warming stream temperatures are just a few of the critical natural resources that will be discussed at the Climate, Conservation, and Community in Alaska and Northwest Canada conference being held Nov. 4-5 at the Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage, Alaska.

In partnership with the Aleutian and Bearing Sea Islands LCC and the Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS), the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center will sponsor a community conversation on climate change in Unalaska, Alaska. This session is being hosted by the Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska and will take place on September 18 from 7:00-9:00 PM at the Museum of the Aleutians.

Along with USGS colleagues Ed Neal and Gary Solin, AK CASC and Alaska Science Center hydrologist Ryan Toohey has published a new USGS open file report, Guidelines for the Collection of Continuous Stream Water-Temperature Data in Alaska.

Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center and USGS Alaska Science Center hydrologist Ryan Toohey has joined fellow USGS researchers Paul Schuster and Nicole Herman-Mercer in conducting an innovative project known as “Strategic Needs of Water on the Yukon” or SNOWY.

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a group of people face each other and talk

Where does one start when tackling the thorny challenge of talking about climate change? AK CASC staff and researchers held an interactive seminar at the 2019 Alaska Forum on the Environment in Anchorage last week.

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Research Highlight

Berries are extremely important to human and wildlife communities in Alaska, and in some locations abundance has decreased significantly in recent years.

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