Fellows' Research Projects

The Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center Fellows are graduate students and post doctoral researchers whose projects broadly address social-ecological system responses to climate change in Alaska. Their projects also align with the research directions of the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center, which are determined collaboratively by representatives of federal, state, tribal, and regional organizations.

Active-Layer Soil Moisture Content Regional Variations in Alaska and Russia by Ground-Based and Satellite-Based Methods, 2002 through 2014
Mar 2013 to Jan 2015

Soil moisture is a vital physical parameter of the active-layer in permafrost environments, and associated biological and geophysical processes operative at the microscopic to hemispheric spatial scales and at hourly to multi-decadal time scales.

An Evaluation of Reanalysis Products for Alaska to Facilitate Climate Impact Studies
Aug 2011 to Aug 2014

Alaska is experiencing effects of global climate change due, in large part, to the positive feedback mechanisms associated with polar amplification. The major risk factors include loss of sea ice, glaciers, thawing permafrost, increased wildfires, and ocean acidification.

Arctic Diurnal Land-Surface Temperature Range Changes Derived by NASA MODIS-Terra and -Aqua 2000 through 2012
Mar 2009 to Apr 2014

The diurnal variation of surface temperature is a fundamental parameter as it is a driver of physical processes of atmosphere-land and -ocean energy and mass cycles playing a key role in meteorology and climatology.

Changes in extreme hydroclimate events in Interior Alaskan boreal forest watersheds
Sep 2010 to Dec 2014

The high latitude regions of the globe are responding to climate change at unprecedented magnitudes and rates.

Downscaled projections of rain/snow partitioning for Alaska
Jan 2012 to Jun 2013

We combined daily temperature, precipitation, and snowfall data from weather stations throughout Alaska with downscaled gridded temperature projections from SNAP to create a set of downscaled snow projections for Alaska at 771m resolution.

Downscaled projections of rain/snow partitioning for Alaska
Jan 2012 to Jun 2013

We combined daily temperature, precipitation, and snowfall data from weather stations throughout Alaska with downscaled gridded temperature projections from SNAP to create a set of downscaled snow projections for Alaska at 771m resolution.

Dynamical downscaling for Alaska
Aug 2013 to Aug 2016

Dynamical downscaling uses regional models to downscale the coarse output of global climate models and reanalyses to finer spatial and temporal resolution so that such data can be better used by stakeholders for research and planning for future climate change.

GOSAT CH4 and CO2, MODIS Evapotranspiration on the Northern Hemisphere June and July 2009, 2010 and 2011
May 2012 to Apr 2013

The Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) affords an ability to assess and monitor CH4 and CO2 near-surface atmospheric concentrations globally on monthly scales pertaining to biogeochemical cycles and anthropogenic emissions.

ICESat-Derived Elevation Changes on the Lena Delta and Laptev Sea, Siberia
Mar 2009 to Jan 2014

We employ elevation data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) to investigate surface changes across the Lena Delta and sea ice of the coastal Laptev Sea, Siberia during winters of 2003 through 2008.

Instability in PDO teleconnections
Jan 2012 to Jun 2013

The Pacific Decadal Oscillation or PDO is an index of Pacific Ocean surface temperature variability used in seasonal forecasting and in understanding links between climate and ecosystem processes.  It's influence on climate, however, does not appear to be stable over time in many places.

Linked Disturbance Interactions in South-central Alaska: Implications for Ecosystems and People
Dec 2011 to Jun 2013

My Alaska CASC project focused on understanding how a massive spruce bark beetle outbreak on the Kenai Peninsula has affected subsequent wildfire occurrence (Fig. 1).

Linked Disturbance Interactions in South-central Alaska: Implications for Ecosystems and People
Dec 2011 to Jun 2013

My Alaska CASC project focused on understanding how a massive spruce bark beetle outbreak on the Kenai Peninsula has affected subsequent wildfire occurrence (Fig. 1).

MODIS-Derived Arctic Land-Surface Temperature Trends
Mar 2009 to Jan 2013

Across the Arctic changes in active layer, melting of glaciers and ground ice, thawing of permafrost and sequestration changes of carbon storage are driven in part by variations of land surface heat absorption, conduction and re-radiation relative to solar irradiance.

MODIS-Derived Nighttime Arctic Land-Surface Temperature Nascent Trends and Non-Stationary Changes
Mar 2009 to Jun 2014

Arctic nighttime land-surface temperatures derived by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors onboard the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites are investigated.

Multi-Satellite and Sensor Derived Trends and Variation of Snow Water Equivalent on the High-Latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere
Mar 2011 to Feb 2012

Utilizing more than 30 years of satellite-microwave sensor derived snow water equivalent data on the high-latitudes of the northern hemisphere we investigate regional trends and variations relative to elevation.

Nature-based Tour Operator Response to Environmental Change in Juneau, Alaska
Apr 2013 to Aug 2014

Increasing temperatures are projected to have a positive effect on the length of Alaska’s summer tourism season, but the natural attractions that tourism relies on, such as glaciers, wildlife, fish, or other natural resources, may change.

Remote Sensing, Model-Derived and Ground Measurements of Snow Water Equivalent and Snow Density in Alaska
Mar 2011 to Nov 2012

Snow water equivalent (SWE) is important for investigations of annual to decadal-scale changes in Arctic environment and energy-water cycles. Passive microwave satellite-based retrieval algorithm estimates of SWE now span more than three decades.

Understanding controls on potential evaporation (PET) and avoiding "doing the wrong thing more precisely"
Jan 2012 to Jun 2013

We often develop high resolution of possible evaporation (PET) data and projections using temperature and precipitation data because they are widely available and of good quality.  But simple projections can be misleading, especially at high latitudes where changes in cloud cover can offset