Location: 
Alaska

This video shows landscapes of Alaska. From glaciers in the Alaska Range, to the Interior's boreal forest and the Arctic tundra--this short movie highlights the importance and stunning beauty of Alaska's frozen lands. It contains footage taken by Alessio Gusmeroli during research expeditions to the study glaciers, snow and permafrost in Alaska. The soundtrack for this movie is "Arktika" by the Russian artist Mara, who kindly gave permission to use this song for research and education. It fits perfectly with the landscapes shown in the video.

alaska mountain range near a lake
Funded Title: 
Western Alaska Coastal Hazards and Stream and Lake Monitoring
Location: 
Alaska
Duration: 
September 30, 2012 to December 31, 2014

Water is a key resource in Alaska: Although it comprises 17 percent of the country’s land area, Alaska contains more than 40 percent of the United States’ surface water. Climate changes are anticipated to greatly impact water processes (hydrology), including water temperature and seasonal precipitation patterns and amounts. Understanding the likely impacts of climate change on hydrology is an important first step toward understanding consequent impacts on natural and human communities.
 

The last reporting period for the AK CASC (2015) saw Alaska set a new record for its warmest year ever, surpassing even the previous record warmth of 2014. This warm trend continued into 2016 — with this year ultimately besting the short-lived 2015 record.

This white paper by J. Littell, J. Koch, J. Young, and R. Toohey describes some of the impacts of ecological drought in Alaska, including changes in permafrost, fire, and vegetation change.

For the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center the past two years have been very busy, marked by continued growth and some well deserved recognition as our research and outreach agendas mature.

Location: 
Alaska
Duration: 
March 1, 2013 to January 1, 2015

Soil moisture is a vital physical parameter of the active-layer in permafrost environments, and associated biological and geophysical processes operative at the microscopic to hemispheric spatial scales and at hourly to multi-decadal time scales. While in-situ measurements can give the highest quality of information on a site-specific basis, the vast permafrost terrains of North America and Eurasia require space-based techniques for assessments of cause and effect and long-term changes and impacts from the changes of permafrost and the active-layer.

Location: 
Alaska
Duration: 
March 1, 2011 to November 1, 2012

Snow water equivalent (SWE) is important for investigations of annual to decadal-scale changes in Arctic environment and energy-water cycles. Passive microwave satellite-based retrieval algorithm estimates of SWE now span more than three decades. SWE retrievals by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observation System (AMSR-E) onboard the NASA-Aqua satellite ended at October 2011. A critical parameter in the AMSR-E retrieval algorithm is snow density assumed from surveys in Canada and Russia from 1940s-1990s.

Location: 
Alaska
Duration: 
January 1, 2012 to June 1, 2013

We combined daily temperature, precipitation, and snowfall data from weather stations throughout Alaska with downscaled gridded temperature projections from SNAP to create a set of downscaled snow projections for Alaska at 771m resolution.  These projections identify the fraction of wet days where precipitation falls as snow rather than rain and can be transformed into estimates of snow water equivalent or SWE by multiplying the data by the total amount of precipitation.  The data are available from SNAP and have already been used by several studies.

Objectives of stream monitoring programs differ considerably among many of the academic, Federal, state, tribal, and non-profit organizations in the state of Alaska. Broad inclusion of stream-temperature monitoring can provide an opportunity for collaboration in the development of a statewide stream-temperature database.

Location: 
Juneau, Alaska
Duration: 
April 1, 2013 to August 1, 2014

Increasing temperatures are projected to have a positive effect on the length of Alaska’s summer tourism season, but the natural attractions that tourism relies on, such as glaciers, wildlife, fish, or other natural resources, may change. In order to continue to derive benefits from these resources, nature-based tour operators may have to adapt to these changes, and communication is an essential component of the adaptation process. The goal of this study is to determine how to provide useful climate change information to nature-based tour operators by answering the following questions: 1.

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