grassy wetland area

Yukon Delta NWR - Credit: Kristine Sowl, USFWS

Funded Title: 
Arctic LCC and Western Alaska LCC Landscape Change
Location: 
Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) and Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD)
Duration: 
August 1, 2017 to July 31, 2022

Alaska’s Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) and Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) provide essential habitat for wildlife of management interest, including diverse communities of shorebirds and waterfowl. The low-lying ACP region is located on the North Slope of Alaska, and is rich with shallow lakes and ponds that form as a result of permafrost freeze-thaw cycles. This region is a primary nesting site for many migratory birds. The YKD, meanwhile, is a vast wetland/tundra landscape on Alaska’s remote western coast.

thermokarst landscape on an island
Funded Title: 
Thermokarst Monitoring at the Landscape Level: A Feasibility Study
Location: 
North Slope, Alaska
Duration: 
September 1, 2012 to December 1, 2013

Permafrost – the thick layer of permanently frozen soil found in Arctic regions – has been thawing rapidly over the past century due to climate change. When permafrost thaws unevenly, it produces thermokarst landscapes, irregular surfaces of small hills interspersed with hollows. The processes that produce thermokarst can lead to significant changes within the surrounding ecosystems, altering water quality, vegetation, and water, carbon, and nutrient storage and flows.

Location: 
Alaska
Duration: 
March 1, 2011 to February 1, 2012

Utilizing more than 30 years of satellite-microwave sensor derived snow water equivalent data on the high-latitudes of the northern hemisphere we investigate regional trends and variations relative to elevation. On the low-elevation tundra regions encircling the Arctic we find high statistically significant trends of snow water equivalent. Across the high Arctic Siberia and Far East Russia through North America and northern Greenland we find increasing trends of snow water equivalent with local region variations in strength.

Location: 
Alaska
Duration: 
March 1, 2009 to June 1, 2014

Arctic nighttime land-surface temperatures derived by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors onboard the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites are investigated. We use the local equator crossing times of 22:30 and 01:30, respectively, in the analysis of changes, trends and variations on the Arctic region and within 120° sectors. We show increases in the number of days above 0°C and significant increase trends over their decadal periods of March 2000 through 2010 (MODIS Terra) and July 2002 through 2012 (MODIS Aqua).

Location: 
Alaska
Duration: 
March 1, 2009 to April 1, 2014

The diurnal variation of surface temperature is a fundamental parameter as it is a driver of physical processes of atmosphere-land and -ocean energy and mass cycles playing a key role in meteorology and climatology. Our investigation focus is on the diurnal variation of land-surface temperature derived by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) deployed on the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites.

Location: 
Alaska
Duration: 
March 1, 2009 to January 1, 2013

Across the Arctic changes in active layer, melting of glaciers and ground ice, thawing of permafrost and sequestration changes of carbon storage are driven in part by variations of land surface heat absorption, conduction and re-radiation relative to solar irradiance. We investigate Arctic land-surface temperature changes and regional variations derived by the MODIS sensors on NASA Aqua and Terra from March 2000 through July 2012.

This collection of products summarizes baseline and projected temperature and precipitation. The animations and maps are focused on the northern portion of Alaska, while the raster data have a much larger spatial extent covering Alaska and Western Canada (YT, BC, AB, SK, and MB).

"Arctic Land-Surface Temperatures Increasing from 2000-2012 Derived by MODIS Sensors on NASA Earth Observing Satellites" was a poster presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall 2012 Meeting in San Francisco, California.

 

"Global climate model performance in the Arctic: Opportunities and challenges for downscaling" is a presentation that was delivered by John Walsh of the University of Alaska Fairbanks at the 2011 Downscaling Workshop.

"The Importance of Climate Variability in the Arctic" is a presentation by Uma S. Bhatt with contributions from Peter Bieniek and V.A. Alexeev.

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