Location: 
Alaska and Washington
Duration: 
June 1, 2015 to June 1, 2017

This project will extend understanding of the role of glaciers in the hydrology of Alaska and Washington state and incorporate this knowledge into two types of simulation models. The project will develop robust methods for hydrologic modeling that will be applicable throughout AK and WA, including areas lacking types of on-the-ground measurements traditionally required for this type of research.

Funded Title: 
Distribution and Flow of Water in Alaskan Coastal Forest Watersheds
Co-PIs: 
Location: 
Southeast Alaska
Duration: 
August 1, 2014 to August 1, 2016

The flow of water is often highlighted as a priority in land management planning and assessments. A recent evaluation of climate impacts to freshwater aquatic systems identified water as a key supporting ecosystem service. Reduced snowfall and snowpack, earlier spring runoff, increased winter streamflow and flooding, and decreased summer streamflow were identified as potential impacts due to climate change. These factors all have close links to the water balance in the perhumid coastal temperate rainforest (PCTR).

"Assessing the Impacts of Glacier Change in the Coastal Temperate Rainforest" was a presentation created after the Juneau Glacier Workshop for a public audience in Juneau, Alaska. It gives a borad overview of the various ways that glaciers interact with other parts of the coastal temperate rainforest. 

"The streamflow hydrology of glacierized watersheds: a brief overview" is a presentation by Sean W. Fleming of the Meteorological Service of Canada, Science Division that was given at the Juneau Glacier Workshop.

Presentation slides delivered by Faron Anslow with coauthors Gerd Bürger, Trevor Murdock, Arelia Werner, Derek van der Kamp and David Rodenhuis from the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada on 28 April 2011. 

Funded Title: 
Western Alaska Coastal Hazards and Stream and Lake Monitoring
Duration: 
February 19, 2013

Coastal hazards, such as storm surges, erosion, and flooding, as well as coastal, stream, and lake processes, are very important factors that influence ecosystems in western Alaska. An analysis of coastal hazards and a monitoring program of streams and lakes are needed to provide a better understanding of how climate change will impact this region. This project will be implemented as a joint effort among the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center (AK CASC), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative (WALCC).

Funded Title: 
Integrating Studies of Glacier Dynamics and Estuarine Chemistry in the context of Landscape Change in the Arctic
Duration: 
February 19, 2013

The Jago, Okpilak, and Hulahula rivers in the Arctic are heavily glaciated watersheds that are important for fish and wildlife, subsistence, recreation, and, potentially, resource extraction on the coastal plain. If current glacial loss trends continue, most of the ice in these rivers will disappear in the next 50-100 years. It is important to understand the response of these rivers to climate change and the role of shrinking glaciers in the future dynamics of these rivers and the estuarine environments they influence.

Funded Title: 
Implications of Glacier Change in Alaska
Location: 
Juneau, Alaska
Duration: 
October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013

As climate changes, watersheds along the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) are experiencing some of the highest rates of glacier melting on Earth, causing significant societal and ecological impacts on the structure and productivity of marine ecosystems, safety hazards related to glaciers, hydropower generation, and sea-level rise. This project will bring together scientists and land and resource managers at a workshop to establish a cross-disciplinary framework for developing new tools to monitor and anticipate future changes in glacier runoff along the GOA.

Funded Title: 
SnowDATA: Snow Datasets for Arctic Terrestrial Applications
Location: 
Alaska
Duration: 
July 15, 2012 to September 30, 2013

Detailed information on snow conditions is critical for understanding a wide range of hydrologic and ecosystem processes, including those related to surface energy and moisture stores and fluxes, along with subsequent impacts on vegetation, insects, mammals, birds, and fish. In Arctic Alaska, however, such snow datasets currently do not exist at the spatial and temporal scales required by end users such as scientists, land managers, and policy makers.

Funded Title: 
Assessing the Sensitivity of Alaska’s Coastal Rainforest Ecosystems to Changes in Glacier Runoff
Location: 
Gulf of Alaska, Alaska Science Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, University of Alaska Southeast
Duration: 
September 1, 2011 to September 1, 2013

Coastal temperate rainforests along the Gulf of Alaska are experiencing high rates of glacier mass loss, primarily due to changes in climate.  The high sensitivity of glaciers to climate forcing results in strong impacts on freshwater runoff from glacierized basins.  This project will develop methods to quantify runoff from watersheds along the Gulf of Alaska, thereby allowing an assessment of impacts on coastal ecosystems.

Subscribe to hydrology