thermokarst landscape on an island
Funded Title: 
Thermokarst Monitoring at the Landscape Level: A Feasibility Study
Location: 
North Slope, Alaska
Duration: 
September 1, 2012 to December 1, 2013

Permafrost – the thick layer of permanently frozen soil found in Arctic regions – has been thawing rapidly over the past century due to climate change. When permafrost thaws unevenly, it produces thermokarst landscapes, irregular surfaces of small hills interspersed with hollows. The processes that produce thermokarst can lead to significant changes within the surrounding ecosystems, altering water quality, vegetation, and water, carbon, and nutrient storage and flows.

Funded Title: 
Distribution and Flow of Water in Alaskan Coastal Forest Watersheds
Co-PIs: 
Location: 
Southeast Alaska
Duration: 
August 1, 2014 to August 1, 2016

The flow of water is often highlighted as a priority in land management planning and assessments. A recent evaluation of climate impacts to freshwater aquatic systems identified water as a key supporting ecosystem service. Reduced snowfall and snowpack, earlier spring runoff, increased winter streamflow and flooding, and decreased summer streamflow were identified as potential impacts due to climate change. These factors all have close links to the water balance in the perhumid coastal temperate rainforest (PCTR).

"The streamflow hydrology of glacierized watersheds: a brief overview" is a presentation by Sean W. Fleming of the Meteorological Service of Canada, Science Division that was given at the Juneau Glacier Workshop.

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